The 80 Best Horror Movies on Amazon Prime Right Now

Movies Lists Amazon Prime
Share Tweet Submit Pin
The 80 Best Horror Movies on Amazon Prime Right Now

After drawing up huge rankings of the best horror movies on Netflix and the best horror movies on Hulu, it’s safe to say we’ve gotten used to the challenge of diving through the refuse of a streaming service and searching for the gems. But we’ve never really experienced a library with just as much junk in it as the Amazon library. If you’ve been paying attention, then you know this is only compounded by the fact that the “browse” function on Amazon Video is completely and utterly broken.

That said, Amazon subscribers also have access to a wealth of riches, many of them hiding in plain sight. Slowly but surely, they’ve built what is truly the biggest and most comprehensive horror library of all the major services—there’s really no question now that they’ve surpassed Netflix, Hulu and all other streamers except for genre-specific services like Shudder. The trick is realizing those movies are there at all. Sure, it’s no surprise that Hereditary or A Quiet Place are now on the service, given their still recent releases. But did you know Amazon Prime was loaded with classic Italian giallo movies like Deep Red, Opera and Blood and Black Lace? Or werewolf classics like Dog Soldiers and Ginger Snaps? Or more 1980s slashers than you can wave a machete at? There are all sorts of great movies here, which have made us expand the scope of this list all the way to 80.

Therefore, fall back on our list of films that are worth your time for one reason or another—just don’t expect to find them via browsing, when something like Carrie only shows up when you’re 30 pages deep.


Here are the 80 best horror movies on Amazon Prime:

birdemic-shock-and-terror.24938 (Custom).jpg 80. Birdemic: Shock and Terror
Year: 2008
Director: James Nguyen
Birdemic is an absolutely horrendous film, but it’s one that absolutely everyone who’s ever enjoyed The Room needs to put on their list. On first inspection it simply looks like a rip-off of Hitchcock’s The Birds, but in reality it’s so much worse and more fascinating than that. The parallels to The Room are extremely accurate: Like Tommy Wiseau’s famously inept film, Birdemic is the product of a single, deranged mind, that of the Vietnamese-born would-be auteur James Nguyen, whose non-native writing fills the dialog with mind-bending absurdities and a pathetically sincere attempt at an ecological message. The actors seem to be people that Nguyen scooped off the street moments before shooting began, completely wooden and unsure of where they are or how they got here. Technical gaffes abound. And when the birds finally show up, the film is graced by some of the most gut-bustingly hilarious FX of all time—clip-art birds that flutter in place, suspended in mid-air while the heroes swipe at them with coat hangers. This is all in Birdemic. You need to see Birdemic. But please, I’m warning you: Ignore Nguyen’s self-aware attempt to follow up on the film with Birdemic 2: The Resurrection. The magic, unsurprisingly, is gone. — Jim Vorel


thankskilling poster (Custom).jpg 79. Thankskilling
Year: 2008
Director: Jordan Downey
In the pantheon of zany, holiday-themed horror movies, Thankskilling is somehow both the very worst and the very best. It’s immediately obvious that this profane, smutty horror-comedy about a killer turkey is “bad on purpose,” but at the same time it displays incompetence both intentional and unintentional. The performers, especially the leads, are bad in ways that no amount of coaching could ever help, but that turkey … his one-liners are somehow just crass enough to often be side-splitting. Made for a mere $3,500, it’s a clear case where a writer-director’s cleverness is on an entirely different level from the poor souls he was able to scrape together to make his film, and the effect is an endearingly weird mix of repulsion and charm. Enjoy it for what it is, but by all means, avoid the horrendous, shark-jumping sequel, Thankskilling 3. If you’re wondering about that title, it’s because the series skipped right over Thankskilling 2. Trust me, it’s not as clever as it sounds. —Jim Vorel


53. white zombie (Custom).jpg 78. White Zombie
Year: 1932
Director: Victor Halperin
One doesn’t need a Shudder subscription to see White Zombie—it’s readily available in the public domain, and you’ll see it included in every cheapo horror box set for that reason. Outside of star Bela Lugosi, the acting is pretty atrocious, but it’s a film that horror purists need to check off their lists at some point simply due to its influence and importance to the genre as the first-ever “zombie film.” Zombies, of course, had a very different connotation in the pre-George Romero world—these are Haitian voodoo zombies, Lugosi their spellbinding ringleader with the hypnotic eyes. This was in an age before subtlety had arrived in horror, so the name of Lugosi’s character is literally “Murder,” and he spends most of the film mucking about in the affairs of an engaged couple, zombifying the woman in the process to become his slave. It’s only 67 minutes long, so what do you have to lose? If you end up watching Revolt of the Zombies, King of the Zombies and I Walked with a Zombie afterward, I swear off all responsibility. —Jim Vorel


midnight-meat-train-poster.jpg 77. The Midnight Meat Train
Year: 2008
Director: Ryuhei Kitamura
Considering that Star is Born Oscar nomination, Bradley Cooper probably looks back on the likes of The Midnight Meat Train in the same way that Jennifer Anniston views her young self in Leprechaun, although if we’re being honest, Cooper has considerably less to be embarrassed about. This is a competent adaptation of the classic short story from author Clive Barker’s Books of Blood, concerning an investigative photographer who stumbles onto a series of serial killings that seem to occur in New York City’s subway system. Soon he’s tailing the killer, an effectively blank and stone-faced Vinnie Jones, through atmospheric subway set-pieces as he tries to figure out why this guy is hanging late-night subway passengers from meathooks. Featuring strong performances that bolster a simple premise, The Midnight Meat Train takes a last-minute left turn into inanity, but that’s on Barker more than director Kitamura. You might find the conclusion a little absurd, but it’s a ride worth taking, especially as part of a Bradley Cooper retrospective. —Jim Vorel


the town that dreaded sundown poster (Custom).jpg 76. The Town That Dreaded Sundown
Year: 1976
Director: Charles B. Pierce
The original version of The Town That Dreaded Sundown feels like a strange outlier among other proto-slashers, thanks to its insistence on marketing itself as a dramatization of a true story. This it does with surprising fealty in many ways: Its depiction of a string of murders in 1946 Texas is actually pretty accurate to the historical record, but that accuracy sometimes comes at the cost of a complete narrative. As in reality, the killer is never caught, and the film never deigns to speculate as toward his identity or true motivations—it’s the rare slasher film that is largely depicted from the perspective of the police trying to catch the killer, rather than the killer’s motley crew of victims, an embryonic version of David Fincher’s Zodiac. As a result, there’s an exploitative edge to The Town That Dreaded Sundown, and it’s unsurprising that the film offended family members of the people who had been killed, especially with its claim that the killer “still lurks the streets of Texarkana.” Still, perhaps they were right. In the end, this film is a gritty, sober, almost depressive slice of rural bloodthirstiness that raises more questions than it answers. (We should note that there is one extremely goofy kill, involving a trombone, that seems much more slasher-esque than the others.) —Jim Vorel


hatchet-adam-green-poster.jpg 75. Hatchet
Year: 2006
Director: Adam Green
Hatchet was the beneficiary of a lot of horror geek goodwill when it first arrived in 2006, the first in what became a more commonplace movement to faithfully recreate 1980s-style slasher films for the post-millennium audience. In truth, there wasn’t all that much that was special about this movie, outside of some good makeup and a memorable design for its killer, Victor Crowley, ably brought to life by former Jason Voorhees portrayer Kane Hodder. The story, certainly is simple as slasher premises come: A bunch of idiots venture out into the swamp and get picked off one by one by the hulking, deformed Crowley. Notable today mostly just for a few good kills (the skull-ripping one is still both excellent and gross), Hatchet didn’t quite retain its buzz, but it’s a serviceable modern slasher. —Jim Vorel


the little shop of horrors poster (Custom).jpg 74. The Little Shop of Horrors
Year: 1960
Director: Roger Corman
If you’ve only seen the Broadway musical or the 1986, Rick Moranis-fronted remake of The Little Shop of Horrors, then Roger Corman’s 1960 original might be something of a tough sell. It’s shot in grainy, low-budget black and white, of the kind that typified Corman’s horror comedies such as A Bucket of Blood in the same era, but it’s got an earnest goofiness that survives through it all. Seymour Krelboyne (Jonathan Hayes) is one of cinema’s great nebbishes, but you can’t help but root for the guy on some level, even as he’s manipulated to commit murders in service of a blood-drinking plant. And of course, the film is also filled with easter eggs, from the appearance of classic Corman bit player Dick Miller (of Gremlins and Terminator) to the weirdo performance turned in by a very young Jack Nicholson as a masochistic dental patient. And really—the film is a brisk 72 minutes long, so it’s not as if you’re making too much of a commitment here. —Jim Vorel


woman in black poster (Custom).jpg 73. The Woman in Black
Year: 2012
Director: James Watkins
There’s not much to this 2012 modern Hammer Horror film—nothing unique about it, but it’s quite competently assembled. With that said, you could argue that simply producing a ghost story this traditional in 2012 offered a bit of novelty. Daniel Radcliffe, fresh off his final Harry Potter appearance, took a role playing “an adult” as Arthur Kipps, a Victorian era lawyer who travels to the country to negotiate the sale of a house that is revealed to be haunted by the spirit of the Woman in Black. This CGI specter has a particular fondness for targeting children, and the film becomes a mystery in the “placate this restless spirit and set her free” mold. It offers a few fun twists and turns, and evokes classic British haunted house movies as Radcliffe stalks through dark, cobwebbed rooms with a flaming candelabra to light his way. The ending is a bit derivative of Sam Raimi’s Drag Me to Hell, but all in all this is a better-than-average, classical ghost story. —Jim Vorel


final exam poster (Custom).jpg 72. Final Exam
Year: 1981
Director: Jimmy Huston
During the height of the early slasher boom, some horror films attempted to carve out unique niches for themselves and expand the boundaries of the genre. Others were merely content to copy-cat the conventions of other films and let the bodies fall where they may. Final Exam falls mostly into the latter camp—the filmmakers were literally instructed to produce Halloween, except on a college campus, and this is the result. Still, there are a few little idiosyncrasies that make it more memorable than some of the other Halloween or Friday the 13th clones. Most notable is the killer himself, who is presented as a completely unknown, rampaging force to whom motive (or even identity!) is never ascribed. The anonymous, seemingly unmotivated nature of the threat makes it easier to sympathize with the college kids, rather than simply rooting for their voyeuristic deaths, as becomes common the longer the slasher genre is around. It’s a minor entry in the “death stalks campus” genre that also includes such films as Happy Death Day, The House on Sorority Row and Graduation Day. —Jim Vorel


48. children of the corn (Custom).jpg 71. Children of the Corn
Year: 1984
Director: Fritz Kiersch
It’s not often that the adults should be the ones afraid to watch a horror movie with kids, but it would be hard not to look at kids differently after 1984’s Children of the Corn, one of the higher-profile entries in horror’s “kids kill all the adults” subgenre. The film focuses on a cult in a fictional Gatlin, Nebraska, led by child preacher Isaac, who is convinced by an entity called He Who Walks Behind the Rows that all adults over 18 should get the axe. We see Burt and Vicky (played by Peter Horton and Linda Hamilton) struggle to escape the small town after driving through and hitting a young, dying boy with their car. There’s plenty of slasher scares and creepy visuals, but like any good horror movie, it’s a commentary on society, man, and like Lord of the Flies before it, this Stephen King-based story looks toward our kids to point out the oddities of our culture (including an obsession with religion). —Tyler Kane


day of the animals poster (Custom).jpg 70. Day of the Animals
Year: 1977
Director: William Girdler
After Jaws became the first true summer blockbuster in 1975, “animals attack” films proliferated. 1976’s Grizzly was the first big success in the “Jaws on land” variants, and director William Girdler followed it up with Day of the Animals, which could probably be considered the logical zenith of the “nature attacks” premise—an all-out war of all animals vs. all humans. As in, solar radiation somehow causes every animal above 5,000 feet of elevation to go insane, attacking anything in their path. A group of hikers are menaced by all kinds of animals—mountain lions, bears, birds of prey and even pet dogs. Leslie Nielsen, five years before his career-altering comedic turn in Airplane!, appears as the primary human villain, channeling a bit of his Creepshow character from the early ’80s. It’s sort of an ugly film to watch today, but if you’ve always wanted to see a shirtless Leslie Nielsen fight a bear, it’s really your only option. Regardless, of all the films on this list, it’s the one I’d most like to see remade with a big budget. I want to see that movie, and all the killer koalas it would surely entail. —Jim Vorel


mulberry-street-poster.jpg 69. Mulberry Street
Year: 2006
Director: Jim Mickle
Zombies are natural bedfellows with low-budget horror and have been ever since NOTLD. It’s simply not that expensive to apply zombie makeup and have an actor chew on some fake guts. Likewise with the found footage genre—ever since Paranormal Activity and Romero’s own Diary of the Dead in 2007, there have been dozens if not hundreds of cheap, found-footage zombie films. Mulberry Street, on the other hand, doesn’t lean on the found footage crutch, but it does look exceedingly low-budget. Still, this first feature film of capable horror director Jim Mickle (Stake Land, We Are What We Are) feels confident and far deeper than it has to be. Depicting what is essentially a street-level zombie epidemic in downtown Manhattan, it’s like a zombie film as made by an impoverished Robert Altman, weaving together the stories of various apartment dwellers as their lives come crashing down. There have been plenty of urban zombie movies, but this one captures the feeling of powerlessness that an “average person” would truly feel during such an event, completely cut off from any kind of information on what is happening, not to mention why it’s happening. Of every film on this list, Mulberry Street might well capture the most “realistic” zombie panic, the sort of event that must have happened prior to the beginning of the events in The Walking Dead. The only downside is that it looks like a film made for $60,000, but in the vein of Evil Dead 2, it would be cool to see Mickle remake it one day with a real budget. —Jim Vorel


madman 1981 poster (Custom).jpg 68. Madman
Year: 1982
Director: Joe Giannone
Madman is one of those perfectly serviceable early ’80s slashers that simply suffers in comparison to memories of the superior films it’s ripping off—namely Friday the 13th and The Burning. In actuality, this camp-set story was essentially going to be an adaptation of the same source material as The Burning, that of the New York “Cropsey” urban legend, before the (much better) film by Tony Maylam beat them to the punch. And lo, we got Madman instead, wherein Cropsey is replaced by the revenant of “Madman Marz,” a murderer who survived hanging and still stalks the woods located conveniently next to the camp for gifted children. This film is exactly what you expect it to be, full of red herrings and drawn-out stalk-and-slash killings. You could throw this on any night of the week and it would immediately feel comfortably familiar to any golden era slasher fan. It doesn’t aspire to be anything more than that, but it serviceably does its duty. —Jim Vorel


house at the end of time poster (Custom).jpg 67. The House at the End of Time
Year: 2013
Director: Alejandro Hidalgo
I earlier made the mistake of thinking this film was part of the prolific Spanish indie horror market, which has given us the likes of Nacho Vigalondo and Guillermo Del Toro, but The House at the End of Time is actually Venezuelan in origin. It’s ambitious but somewhat messy, a story about a family that undergoes a traumatic, fracturing event and its fallout over the course of 30 years. The eventual revelation of the twist pushes the story into more of a “sci-fi horror” direction, and feels somewhat inspired by the prime-era films of M. Night Shyamalan in execution. The film simply isn’t quite as profound as it would like to think it is, and the visual fidelity holds back its “cinematic” quality slightly, but it gets the most out of a strong central performance from its lead. If you get on a South American horror kick, you’ll end up watching it eventually. —Jim Vorel


dont go in the house poster (Custom).jpg 66. Don’t Go in the House
Year: 1979
Director: Joseph Ellison
Many entries on the famous British “video nasties” list of banned or otherwise restricted films are questionable, but Don’t Go in the House is one of those movies to actually earn the title in some respects—it truly is a nasty, mean-spirited movie with a seriously nihilistic streak. Equal parts Psycho, Carrie and Halloween, its central character/antagonist is a man who suffered long-running and traumatic abuse at the hands of his Norma Bates-esque mother, and lashes out at the world with fire as his preferred weapon to purify the world of evil. Some of its kills are particularly grisly, including graphic depictions of young women being burnt alive, and one imagines it was these sequences that partially inspired the fake trailer for Don’t, which ran in between segments of Rodriguez/Tarantino’s Grindhouse. Today, Don’t Go in the House stands as a minor grindhouse classic that appeals to the viewer with a somewhat misanthropic streak. —Jim Vorel


horror express poster (Custom).jpg 65. Horror Express
Year: 1972
Director: Eugenio Martin
An unusual film for its time period, Horror Express stars both Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee, and yet it’s not from Hammer as one would expect. Rather, it was a joint British/Spanish production simply aping the Hammer formula of classy actors in silly premises. This one is particularly weird: An archaeologist played by Lee discovers a “missing link” ape man buried in ice and tries to transport him in secret via train. The still-alive ape man defrosts, however, and proves to be armed with a rather unique set of powers. What follows is a bizarre film about stolen memories and brain-swapping, all taking place aboard the train. There are some really hypnotic performances, especially from relatively unknown Argentinean actor Alberto de Mendoza as a crazed priest. Telly Savalas, TV’s Kojak, even shows up out of right field playing a Russian Cossack officer, sans the usual lollipop. Who loves ya, baby? —Jim Vorel


chillerama poster (Custom).jpg 64. Chillerama
Year: 2011
Directors: Adam Rifkin, Tim Sullivan, Adam Green, Joe Lynch
Chillerama is another anthology, but with a framing story that is a bit more grounded and conventional—all the shorts are simply being viewed at a classic drive-in, until terror leaps off the screen in the form of a zombie outbreak in the theater in the final segment. The individual segments are much more comedy than straight horror, from the runaway killer sperm of “Wadzilla” to the decency-pushing crudeness of “The Diary of Anne Frankenstein.” It’s the sort of horror comedy trying so hard to shock and offend that it occasionally seems desperate, but a good number of the jokes do indeed land. There’s a who’s-who of B-movie actor staples as well: Ray Wise, Eric Roberts, Richard Riehle, Lin Shaye, Kane Hodder and more. A whole lot of filmmakers have tried to make films like this one in the last 15 years, but Chillerama can at least say it executes better than most. Throw it on at a party, if the people present aren’t easily offended. — Jim Vorel


aaah zombies poster (Custom).jpg 63. Aaah! Zombies!!
Year: 2007
Director: Matthew Kohnen
There’s no escaping that in the post-Shaun of the Dead era, indie zombie comedies piled up like so many bodies at the morgue after a zombie outbreak. Many of them are terrible, but occasionally you do get one like Aaah! Zombies! that is a pleasant surprise. The film uses a similar “told from the zombie’s point of view” structure to what you see in Colin, but with a clever, comedic twist: The zombies are conscious and unaware that they’re zombies. Rather, a group of slacker friends believe that they’ve become “super soliders” thanks to a confused military private who’s also become zombified. This is achieved through differing perspectives: When we see things from the zombies’ point of view, the film is colorized and their dialog is audible. When we see things from the perspective of human characters, the film is black-and-white, and the zombies are lumbering and uncoordinated. Our zombies, then, are something like unreliable narrators—we mostly see from their perspective, but we’re quickly made aware that their perspective is incorrect, which is the main source of humor. I’m making this film sound a bit more cerebral than it actually is, though—what one should expect from Aaah! Zombies! is simply some over-the-top slapstick humor, cartoonish zombie violence and silly character actor cameos. It gets a decent amount of mileage and laughs out of a decidedly indie budget. —Jim Vorel


high-tension-poster.jpg 62. High Tension
Year: 2003
Director: Alexandre Aja
High Tension is a film that set the French press ablaze when it arrived in 2003, heralded by some as a depraved lapse in artistic morality while praised by others as the beginning of a new era of extreme horror—one that would eventually come to be referred to as New French Extremity. Lost in the mix, thanks to all the blood and guts, was an appreciation for the things this stalk-and-slash thriller does well, and the nigh-inexcusable nature of its famously frustrating ending. Suffice to say, Haute Tension is wildly uneven from the get-go. Its sequences of the protagonist hiding from the killer, including one in an abandoned highway rest stop, are extremely well executed and brimming with suspense, but it can be difficult to appreciate them once arriving at an absurd denouement that seriously strains the mind’s ability to turn mental backflips in rationalizing it. The film demonstrated the artistic flair that would go on to make the films of Alexandre Aja into notable visual feasts, but your ultimate assessment of it will very much be decided by your opinion on the conclusion. Don’t say we didn’t warn you. —Jim Vorel


slumber party massacre poster (Custom).jpg 61. The Slumber Party Massacre
Year: 1982
Director: Amy Holden Jones
The Slumber Party Massacre is a classic early ’80s cheesefest that holds the distinction of being one of the few slasher movies from the golden age of the genre that was actually directed and written by women—Amy Holden Jones and Rita Mae Brown, respectfully. In fact, Brown originally wrote the film as an early parody of the genre, playing off the tropes established by Halloween and Friday the 13th, but the movie was ultimately filmed as a legitimate horror vehicle instead, leaving it in a unique tonal middle ground that retains a fair amount of black comedy. As a result, it’s a trope-laden film that sees the denizens of the titular slumber party stalked by an escaped maniac (always a popular option, when you don’t want to write a killer’s backstory) armed with a power drill, à la 1979’s The Driller Killer. Ironically, despite being intended as parody, the film ended up establishing a number of “slumber party” horror movie tropes itself, the residuals of which echoed through the slasher genre for a decade to come. It’s also unusual in the sense that it has more than one character who could properly be labeled as a “final girl,” allowing for some tandem offense against the killer. —Jim Vorel


hell house llc poster (Custom).jpg 60. Hell House LLC
Year: 2015
Director: Stephen Cognetti
This is just about as lean and minimalist a concept as you can choose for a modern found footage horror movie, but Hell House LLC is much more a practice in execution than imaginative settings. It’s the documentary-style story of a haunted house crew that picks a decidedly wrong location for their attraction, and boom—they all wind up dead. Very standard set-up for a “no one gets out alive” entry in the found footage genre, but Hell House LLC actually does have some inspiring scares and performances. It gets a whole lot out of very small set-ups and deliveries, such as the shifting positioning of props and the life-size (and appropriately horrifying) clown costumes, shooting scenes in what looks very much like “real time,” with no cuts. There’s a naturalistic air to the actors’ sense of frustration and unease as weird events start to mount, but of course it all goes quite off the deep end and into unintentional humor in the closing moments. Still, there are many islands of genuine, blood pressure-raising fear in this well-executed film. Certainly, it’s better than most found footage efforts in the post-Paranormal Activity landscape. —Jim Vorel


the-gate-poster.jpg 59. The Gate
Year: 1987
Director: Tibor Takacs
Ah, the 1980s—when horror movie premises were a sentence long, and that’s the way we liked it. In the case of The Gate, that sentence would be something like “A boy and his friend find a hole in the backyard that is actually a gate to hell.” And that’s really all there is to The Gate, a charming exercise in Poltergeist-esque haunted house tropes and Goonies-like child protagonists. It’s one of those films where simply describing the plot on paper makes it sound fairly intense (the family dog gets killed, among other things), but the whole thing is presented with an aloof sense of sarcastic detachment, like a lost work from Joe Dante. Suffice to say, we are not meant to take anything in The Gate seriously, and are free to simply enjoy some of the timeless effects work, which includes some very impressive stop-motion animation miniatures. There have been rumors of a modern remake of The Gate, and in an era that is still venerating 1980s pop culture, this is hardly surprising. Its strength is in the simplicity of its premise, which anyone can grasp, and in the way it lovingly embraces the vibe of its era. —Jim Vorel


carnival of souls poster (Custom).jpg 58. Carnival of Souls
Year: 1962
Director: Herk Harvey
Carnival of Souls is a film in the vein of Night of the Hunter: artistically ambitious, from a first-time director, but largely overlooked in its initial release until its rediscovery years later. Granted, it’s not the masterpiece of Night of the Hunter, but it’s a chilling, effective, impressive tale of ghouls, guilt and restless spirits. The story follows a woman (Candace Hilligoss) on the run from her past who is haunted by visions of a pale-faced man, beautifully shot (and played) by director Herk Harvey. As she seemingly begins to fade in and out of existence, the nature of her reality itself is questioned. Carnival of Souls is vintage psychological horror on a miniscule budget, and has since been cited as an influence in the fever dream visions of directors such as David Lynch. To me, it’s always felt something like a movie-length episode of The Twilight Zone, and I mean that in the most complimentary way I can. Rod Serling would no doubt have been a fan. —Jim Vorel


deathgasm poster (Custom).jpg 57. Deathgasm
Year: 2015
Director: Jason Lei Howden
New Zealand is seeing a revival as a hot-spot for indie horror comedies these days, between this film and others such as What We Do in the Shadows and its upcoming sequel, We’re Wolves, harkening back to the days of Peter Jackson. Deathgasm is a simple film, but a fun one that doesn’t aspire to much. A band of surly heavy metal-worshiping high school students stumbles upon “The Black Hymn,” a piece of medieval-era sheet music that has the power to summon demons and possibly bring about the end of the world. Naturally, they adapt it into a garage rock song, and soon enough, the neighborhood is abuzz with gore-heavy scenes of demonic possession. The humor is crude, and not quite as funny as it thinks it is, but the horror scenes are fun, and Deathgasm never drags. It’s been hailed as a new classic by metalheads, but I still think there’s an even better heavy metal horror film waiting to be made out there. Fun trivia note: Walmart refused to sell copies of the film without changing its title to “Heavy Metal Apocalypse,” so they did. —Jim Vorel


toxic avenger poster (Custom).jpg 56. The Toxic Avenger
Year: 1984
Directors: Michael Herz and Lloyd Kaufman
The Toxic Avenger, or simply “Toxie” as he’s known to fans, is the mascot and long-running figurehead of B-movie studio Troma Entertainment, having to date starred in four bone-crushing films. Born when a hapless nerd (Mark Torgl) falls into a barrel of toxic waste, Toxie (Mitch Cohen) is part Batman, part Swamp Thing and part Jason Voorhees, except his ire is thankfully directed solely at the legions of scumbags who ceaselessly seem to populate and spawn in the fictional Tromaville, NJ. A word to the wise: The Toxic Avenger isn’t for consumption by those without a strong stomach, although you could say that about most any of Troma’s classics. Their films aren’t so much “bottom of the barrel” or “lowest common denominator” as they are sub-denominatorial, reveling in their own poor taste and crassness, simultaneously parodying themselves and their own violent, sexual and scatological excesses. There’re no pretensions toward art in a Toxic Avenger movie, simply wish-fulfillment: a monster movie crossed with Death Wish, as performed by high school students. To quote the trailer: “The muggers and rapists didn’t know what law and order was until the Toxic Avenger came to town!” —Jim Vorel


poltergeist 2 poster (Custom).jpg 55. Poltergeist II: The Other Side
Year: 1986
Director: Brian Gibson
From the start, Poltergeist II has a couple of things working in its favor, and a few balancing detractions working against it. The entire cast of the original return, along with the first film’s screenwriters, but lost are the dynamic direction of Tobe Hooper and the overseeing eye of Steven Spielberg, which strips it of a bit of its verve. Still, you can’t fault this sequel for being boring—if anything, Poltergeist II is even weirder and more zany than the original, which wasn’t exactly shy about being off the wall. The infusion of native American mysticism into the sequel is a bit of an odd touch, to the point that you can almost empathize with Craig T. Nelson’s constant doubting and bemoaning of his lot in life, but it’s the faces of this film that really leave a lasting impression. In particular, character actor Julian Beck is haunting as the film’s antagonist, the Rev. Henry Kane, his taut skin and ghoulish features being only amplified by the fact that Beck was tragically wasting away from cancer in real life during filming. The evidence of his passing, like that of child star Heather O’Rourke during Poltergeist III, continue to cast a shadow of unease over the series to this day. Overall, The Other Side isn’t quite as spooky as the original Poltergeist, but the presence of Beck in particular makes up for a lot. —Jim Vorel


childs play poster (Custom).jpg 54. Child’s Play
Year: 1988
Director: Tom Holland
Child’s Play is one of those late ’80s gimmick slashers where it’s all too easy to feel as if you’ve already seen the film, without actually having sat down to watch it. Killer doll, very cheesy, plenty of one-liners, right? Well yes, and no. The original (and pretty obviously best) entry in the Child’s Play series is the most serious-minded (at least slightly) and grounded of the movies, and it goes out of its way to humanize its iconic killer Chucky—or the spirit within him, that of serial killer Charles Lee Ray—more than one might expect. If you’ve never seen a film in the series, ask yourself this: Did you know that the plot of Child’s Play is technically all about voodoo? Because it is. In the end, though, its greatness and inherent watchability boils down to the charms of the wonderful Brad Dourif, who found in Chucky the vessel he needed to become a genre legend forevermore. Like Robert Englund did with Freddy Krueger, Chucky becomes the most beloved aspect of the series because Dourif’s voiceover just oozes charisma and character—he’s more alive than any of the flesh-and-blood characters in this series could ever be. It’s just one of those sublime moments of perfect casting—it’s easy to imagine that no one would remember the Child’s Play series today if that one aspect had been different. —Jim Vorel


the house that dripped blood poster (Custom).jpg 53. The House That Dripped Blood
Year: 1971
Director: Peter Duffell
If the output of British film studio Amicus Productions is usually said to lack the refinement and grandeur of Hammer’s horror films, they always seemed to make up for it with cheeky, good-natured charm. Their anthology horror films, such as Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors have a disarmingly simplistic quality to them—not the stately, stuffy gothic horror of Hammer, and more a continuation of the violent, ironic and comical horror stories seen in American E.C. Comics such as Vault of Horror or Tales From the Crypt. The House That Dripped Blood is one of those vintage anthologies, centered around a cursed house that keeps being inherited by new tenants—which is to say, victims. Its tales are silly and basic, but it’s buoyed by a strong cast of familiar British faces, from the duo of Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee (they’re in different stories, sadly) to Raiders of the Lost Ark’s Denholm Elliott and consummate Hammer buxom beauty Ingrid Pitt. It’s the perfect film for a jovial, Halloween party atmosphere—vintage spooky, but never truly disturbing. —Jim Vorel


48. frankenstein army (Custom).jpg 52. Frankenstein’s Army
Year: 2013
Director: Richard Raaphorst
Indie found footage horror, contrary to what the success of Paranormal Activity would have you believe, is not an easy proposition—not at all. The original Paranormal Activity succeeds as a low-budget triumph because it has such modest goals, and most of the other found footage successes share that in common, but Frankenstein’s Army is very different in that regard. It’s the story of a troop of Russian soldiers in the waning days of WWII, infiltrating a German compound that turns out to be the testing grounds for a Frankenstein-descendent mad scientist. When his undead soldier creations come to life, the Russian soldiers end up fighting for their lives. Plot and performances are essentially unimportant—what ends up being extremely impressive here are the fabulously grisly monster designs, practical effects and inventiveness in staging found footage action sequences. This is an ambitious film that can be dull when there aren’t monster attacks happening, but what they achieved on a limited budget in depicting their monsters is absolutely remarkable. —Jim Vorel


city of the living dead poster (Custom).jpg 51. City of the Living Dead
Year: 1980
Director: Lucio Fulci
If it’s an Italian horror film from the ’70s or ’80s, and it doesn’t involve cannibals, and it’s not a giallo, then it’s probably an arty, stylish, partially incomprehensible movie about zombies and ghosts. Such is City of the Living Dead, and such is almost everything in the filmography of Lucio Fulci. Never a director with the critical acclaim or heightened stature of a Dario Argento, Fulci was instead prolific, making his name in 1979 with the greatest of the Italian zombie films, Zombi 2. City of the Living Dead is considered the first in a so-called “Gates of Hell” trilogy, alongside two of his other best-known works, The Beyond and The House by the Cemetery. Like many of the Italian films it’s set in the U.S.A., which creates a strange, otherworldly quality given the international cast and dubbed dialog. It follows a young woman and her friends, who travel from New York to the Lovecraft-inspired town of Dunwich, where the suicide of a corrupted priest is causing the dead to rise from their graves and strike out at the living. It’s almost more a series of vignettes and unrelated scenes than a straightforward narrative, as residents of the town are killed at random by the zombies. That’s just how Fulci rolls. You don’t watch Lucio Fulci movies for plot; you watch them for atmosphere and stylish splatter. — Jim Vorel

Also in Movies