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Watch: PBS' Version of Little Women Is Destined to Become a Classic

Part II

TV Reviews Little Women
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Watch: PBS' Version of <i>Little Women</i> Is Destined to Become a Classic

Scroll down to the bottom of the page for our video recap of Part II of PBS’ Little Women.

Everyone faces choices, but for women in the era of the Civil War, who they married could make all the difference in their lives.

Aunt March married money and now has her nieces over to keep her, and her bird, company. She has the money, so it seems that she has the power. At least, she has the power to determine how much she shares with her family—and what they get depends on whether she approves of their choices.

Meg decides to try out the high life with her fancy friends and she definitely likes it, but she loves John Brooke more. When her aunt tells her she’ll get nothing if she chooses to marry John, she impulsively says yes. Her heart chooses. Aunt March cuts her off financially, but she’s sweeter than she seems and gives her some pearls anyway.

Beth chose to help a family with scarlet fever and the consequence is a disease that almost kills her, and ultimately is her downfall. Those who are pure in heart often suffer.

Laurie wants to be with Jo. I tend to think this is because he is attracted to her strength. Or it’s true that guys can’t be friends with girls… but I don’t want that to be true, so I’m going with what I said first.

Jo decides she wants to write above all else. And so she does.

The wedding was my favorite part. Granted, it wasn’t as fancy as a royal wedding, but it was full of love and beauty.

Amy has the opportunity to be a companion to go to Europe with Aunt Carol, and Jo is of course very jealous. It does feel like nasty little Amy gets everything, even though she acts the most naughty. That girl needs the time out corner, like indefinitely.

Jo decides to leave town on her own: She was destined to break the mold.

And all her talk about avoiding marriage doesn’t really matter. She meets a single poor German teacher. It’s also clear that New York City living was all about tiny shared spaces even back then.

Beth knew she was dying, but didn’t want to tell her family, and finally tells Jo the truth.

Amy and Laurie end up together so they can be whiny and wealthy together. They deserve each other.

Beth dies, because life is sad and terrible.

And of course Aunt March dies too, but not before she leaves everything to the literary spinster, Jo. She never had children and on her deathbed assumes the same of Jo.

You know how people love the BBC version of Pride and Prejudice with Colin Firth above all others? I think the same will be said about this version of Little Women.

Nothing is ever perfect, but things can be just right. And this miniseries is certainly just right.


Keri is a professional chatterbox who loves watching TV & movies, reading about pop culture, and gawking at any craziness on the internet. You can follow Keri on Twitter.

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